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using seaboard block with Vj software

I come from a design/Vj background, and right now experimenting with controlling various elements in my vj software -VDMX5 & MadMapper- it is a bit tricky but works, would like to know if anyone has experience in this matter.



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That sounds like a great idea. While we don't have that software to try out here, I'd be happy to get you all the info you need to understand what the Seaboard is sending so that you can map it up to any other apps you like. 


A good first port of call is the 5D touch signals, which I'll paste below. It's worth knowing that by default the Seaboard will send these messages on a note-per-channel basis. Depending on what you want to do with those signals, it might be worth setting your Seaboard to single channel mode in ROLI Dashboard, which will simplify the channels being used down to just the one. 


So, your typical Seaboard Block note will consist of the following elements:


Note name – this will be the MIDI note that you first strike.


Strike – this is the initial force with which you contact the keywaves and is transmitted as note-on velocity.


Press – this is the continuous measurement of pressure on the keywaves throughout the note, and it is transmitted as channel pressure (aftertouch).


Glide – this is the full range of left/right gestures from vibrato to glissando. It is transmitted as pitch bend and uses a minimum range of +/- 2 semitones. The range can be set in ROLI Dashboard and it equates to the number of semitones across which the 14bit pitch bend signal is distributed. For example if you set a range of 48 semitones, you'll see that you can move your finger a full 48 semitones up or down from the starting note to reach the full range. If your plan is to use this as a VJ controller, you might consider setting a shorter pitch bend range, since the Seaboard Block's full range is 24 semitones.


Slide – this is the front/back dimension and is transmitted by CC74 (brightness)

Slide is not supported by the Seaboard GRAND.


Lift – this is the speed at which you end contact with the keywave. It is transmitted as note-off (release) velocity.


You might also want to try using MIDI monitor (you'll find something similar in most DAWs too) to see the MIDI signals from the Seaboard so that you can match them up to the controls in VDMX5. Let me know how you get on! If you have any follow-up questions, post them here and we'll see what we can do! 

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Answer

That sounds like a great idea. While we don't have that software to try out here, I'd be happy to get you all the info you need to understand what the Seaboard is sending so that you can map it up to any other apps you like. 


A good first port of call is the 5D touch signals, which I'll paste below. It's worth knowing that by default the Seaboard will send these messages on a note-per-channel basis. Depending on what you want to do with those signals, it might be worth setting your Seaboard to single channel mode in ROLI Dashboard, which will simplify the channels being used down to just the one. 


So, your typical Seaboard Block note will consist of the following elements:


Note name – this will be the MIDI note that you first strike.


Strike – this is the initial force with which you contact the keywaves and is transmitted as note-on velocity.


Press – this is the continuous measurement of pressure on the keywaves throughout the note, and it is transmitted as channel pressure (aftertouch).


Glide – this is the full range of left/right gestures from vibrato to glissando. It is transmitted as pitch bend and uses a minimum range of +/- 2 semitones. The range can be set in ROLI Dashboard and it equates to the number of semitones across which the 14bit pitch bend signal is distributed. For example if you set a range of 48 semitones, you'll see that you can move your finger a full 48 semitones up or down from the starting note to reach the full range. If your plan is to use this as a VJ controller, you might consider setting a shorter pitch bend range, since the Seaboard Block's full range is 24 semitones.


Slide – this is the front/back dimension and is transmitted by CC74 (brightness)

Slide is not supported by the Seaboard GRAND.


Lift – this is the speed at which you end contact with the keywave. It is transmitted as note-off (release) velocity.


You might also want to try using MIDI monitor (you'll find something similar in most DAWs too) to see the MIDI signals from the Seaboard so that you can match them up to the controls in VDMX5. Let me know how you get on! If you have any follow-up questions, post them here and we'll see what we can do! 

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